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20110706
20110706
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economy and do what's best for our people. >> tom: the president aims for a big budget deal, not a stopgap measure, before the end of the month. it's "nightly business report" for tuesday, july 5. this is "nightly business report" with susie gharib and tom hudson. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening and thanks for joining us. with the united states rapidly running out of borrowing room, the president is calling on republicans and democrats to move quickly. mr. obama has called leaders from both parties to the white house for a meeting thursday and susie, he's urging them to think big. >> susie: tom, with the calendar pressuring politicians to negotiate a plan allowing the u.s. to borrow more money, the president wants a deal cut in a few weeks and says it should not be a temporary one lasting only a few months. >> tom: the budget bargaining now heads to the white house with less than a month before time runs out. darren gersh reports. >> rep
the cia gets caught up in this big debate about how to interrogate what to do. >> they say it's tough. anytime they operate outside of iraq and afghanistan in battlefields it becomes murkier. they say they're faced with the question of can he go back to the u.s. and be tried? that has to go through several agencies. can he have a third-party that take him when neither of the two are available, they would be forced to let someone go. >> the obama administration's treatment of the somali terrorist suspect isn't sitting well with lawmakers on capitol hill. among them lindsey graham of south carolina. >> we learned this morning that a gentleman was taken into custody, kept on a u.s. ship and he's now in custody. >> the last thing i'm worried about is prosecuting enemy fighters. i want to find out what they know about the enemy, what intelligence value do they have to the united states. having people on ships has never been used in warfare before in terms of prisons. he should have been sent to guantanamo bay and held as an enemy combatant and interrogated. >> the administration would make
accident a big rig thankfully it is already been cleared from the freeway little backup has been developing on the southbound lane it is creating a little bit of a backups in the southbound lane. you will need an extra few minutes to get through this back up. it should be cleared very shortly a quiet morning as we had to the bay bridge no metering lights for the west bound ride as we have been keeping a close eye on the metering lights caltran has been doing a great job so far this week in managing the traffic flow at the toll plaza at the san mateo bridge still a good ride in the west bound direction it is possible we will see lighter than usual traffic still a few cars to or emerging from the fog on agua golden gate bridge >> families of the seven day area fishermen there's still missing are waiting to hear word of their loved ones. the accident happened in the sea of cortez and the boat capsized write off this island here this is out of where they left in san felipe de you and see the view from the air there's continuing their search today debris has been found and i hope this bill all t
towards concord past pleasant hill on 680 southbound and nearly to highway 4 on 242 southbound. big delays in both directions. there is no indication on when planes will be cleared. when the chp issues alert the believe planes will be blocked for 30 or more minutes. this accident is about 30 minutes old now. our other hot spot is a westbound on the bay bridge. traffic is nearly at a standstill. the back of this to the end of the macarthur maze and even the the the approach is battling back up. bear in mind that one hour ago there was no back up on the bay bridge toll plaza. when other bridges are not doing too badly. the golden gate bridge looks to be a good. although it is under fog when southbound. despite the fog it appears that we will have another sunny and warm day ahead. >> here is the view from our roof camera showing you the fog and also sunshine as well. temperatures in the '50s and '60s. the sun will come out this afternoon, mostly sunny and warm with inland spots getting into the low-mid-90s. we're going to continue cooling as we head towards the weekend. let's talk more about
by suicide. let's talk about this change with chris lawrence. >> reporter: this is a fairly big change. even though, graptnted, only affect a small number of troops who commit suicide. still, ongoing fight in the military and outside the military among families to sort of destigmatize suicide. i think if you listen to the president's statement, that is exactly what this was designed to do. , to sort of, you know, put suicide in a different light. the interesting thing about it was the president had commissioned this review of this policy before making the decision. he said the review was exhaustive, it was tough. which suggests that in some level, there was, you know, some pushback and we look more into that throughout the day to find out exactly maybe where the pushback was and why the folks who didn't want this change, why they felt that way as well. >> as we know, suicide has become a really sad reality within these two wars. chris, thanks. >>> republicans in the nation's first primary state weighing in with their picks with the primary candidates. jim acosta is joining us with a new poll
of the big monthly jobs report. there wasn't an awful lot of movement, as you can see, at the end of the session. the s&p and also the dow were each off by just a fraction, and the nasdaq meanwhile managing to choke up just a small gain. pretty modest, though. about one-third of a percent. this is how the future markets are trading. it seems that we're in for a flat start at the moment. a number of indices down if we look at the futures. but only by a bit. about .07%. >>> britain's most popular newspaper is under hot water. they are facing allegations of phone hacking. today british lawmakers will debate calls for an urgent public inquiry into the affair. this all comes after new claims suggest that after the london underground and bus bombings of 2005, this paper may have tried to hack the victims' phones and the phones of their relatives as well. >>> the new phone hacking claims that have caused so much anger across the united kingdom also centered around a 13-year-old who disappeared on her way home from school back in 2002. her decomposing body was discovered six months later.
to explain why she was exonerated. listen to this. >> the big question was the prosecution did not answer is how caylee died and that was a big factor and i think in a lot of our decisions and it also showed that something with george anthony, casey's father, he was definitely hiding something for all the different times that he was, you know, on the stand. something that happened, he knew about it. and so we did really think she possibly -- we didn't know how she died. but it just comes down to it was probably an accident but the family did not know how to cope with it so instead tried to hide it. >> that was the thing, you know, the prosecution could not say how that baby died. and you got to wonder if moving forward in these kind of high profile cases, you have to have every stinking piece of evidence ever imaginable. do you -- what did we do before we had d.n.a.? did they ever prove any murder convictions? i don't know. >> process cushion said she was suffocated, 300 pieces of evidence but we have no conviction. joining us right now, andrea lyon, former co-leading defense attorney for
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
't you going against the policy that's in place where you're at?" >> smith: manning was taking a big risk. under the army's "don't ask, don't tell" rules, gay soldiers, like manning, were required to keep their sexual orientation secret. his friends also worried about his political activism. >> in his facebook profile, he posted signs and pictures at his presence at rallies. >> smith: gay rights rallies? >> right. this struck me as very dangerous to his position. i mean, i admired him for his... you know, for his courage on this, but i thought it might be a little bit foolhardy. >> smith: during this period, manning also started a relationship with a young man from upstate new york named tyler watkins. on weekends, bradley would visit him in boston, where watkins was studying. during those trips, the young intelligence analyst also found a new group of friends, computer science students and hackers. at the time, wikileaks was already making headlines, and julian assange was an admired figure among hackers. boston opened new doors for manning, but he had a problem back on base. >> he thoug
we are a very fascinating country if youook at a bigcountry with more than 220 million people, a big muslim country, democratic whave a lot of achievement in the past in rucingositive a that was achievement during 40 years. but then we learn a lot that it is not only enough to have a high growth reducing poverty people need to have transparency participation, accountability and good governance. and that's become the lesson learned. we have to pay 75% of our g.d.p. because of the banking system to bail out the crisis. so a lot of lessons learned from indonesia. as a country that is so diverse but a lot ofÑi achievemt. a lot of development lessons can be learned from this country. >> many people when they look at the arab spring they say where's thmodel? some say turkey, others say indonesia. because of the way you handle-- you meaning the indonesians-- after the overthrow of suharto. >> yes. well it is... i mean, you talk indonesia after 12 years of this transition, ve painful transition in '97/'98. that experience, changinfrom centralized to decentralized, from closed society to ope
gave you a big break in your career early on. ek: yes, he did, as an actress. it was very frightening, working with orson welles, because being as physically huge as he was and having to . well, at that time i was very, very small, like in my teens still. and to work with him was not always the most exciting thing in the world in the manner in which you would think this is, "oh my goodness, this is so exciting. " but it was very scary. and at . at the same time, it was very exciting because i was learning so much all the time, particularly when he was with michael mcleimore and hilton head was from the gate theater in dublin and we would all go to lunch . the four . the three of them and me. they would take me to lunch at the calabdos restaurant in paris. and with each of sip of food and with each sip of a drink, they would get up and they would start talking and reciting shakespeare. or marlowe. or even jesus christus, you know. and it was so exciting that i never wanted to move. i was like a fly on the wall. that's why . i think he said i was the most exciting woman in the world, be
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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